Mexican-American Norteño group writes corrido for Bernie Sanders

For much of the campaign trail, pundits have said that Bernie Sanders has a Latino problem.

The narrative has been that his opponent for the Democratic presidential nomination, Hillary Clinton, has stronger roots and ground game among Latino communities and that the voting bloc’s support cannot be wrested away.

But Sanders received a helpful boost in his efforts to prove pundits wrong this week from a somewhat unexpected source: a viral video of a California Norteño band singing a corrido that praises his candidacy.

Grupo La Meta of Modesto, California published their song “El Quemazón” (Translation for “The Burn,” which presumably is a play on “Feeling ‘the Bern'”) to YouTube on Tuesday and the video has been seen more than 30,000 times since. In an interview with Buzzfeed News, Juve Quintana, the 26-year-old singer and songwriter for the group said he was turned on to Sanders by his girlfriend.

“I can relate to him and everything he wants to do for us,” Quintana told Buzzfeed News. “I thought what can I do so the Hispanics, the paisanos, the Mexicans vote for him? Everyone I speak to says ‘I’m going to vote for Hillary’ and I say ‘Have you heard of Bernie Sanders?” And they say ‘No, I don’t even know who that is.’”

A corrido is a traditional poem or song in the Spanish language, which is especially popular in Mexico. In recent years, the song form has been used to lionize drug dealers and cartel leaders, but had been used traditionally to tell romantic stories and epic adventures.

The group’s song follows many of the traditions of corridos like speaking about the protagonist’s life in heroic terms, positioning him as an Everyman fighting against enormous odds and exaggerating some of his characteristics (the song claims Sanders “sees everyone as children of God” even though the candidate has never expressed an overtly religious message during his campaign and characterizes him as a “Robin Hood” figure.)

The song also makes Sanders appealing to working-class Mexican families by touting his record of fighting against the rich, supporting civil rights and fighting against segregation, even calling him “compa,” a word used to designate close friends.

It makes an effort to connect him to the struggle of Mexican working-class families by saying neither the rich nor television want him, emphasizing that Sanders also had immigrant parents and wants everyone – regardless of legal status- to have health insurance and saying that Sanders noticed from a young age that the rich got richer while the poor “no tenian ni para el frijol” – a colloquial way of saying, people were starving.

Here in full are the song’s lyrics in Spanish and English translations:

 

Es un hombre con muchas visiones  (He’s a man with many ideas)

para mejorar a este país, (On how to improve this country)

corriendo para ser presidente, (running to be the next president)

pero los ricos no lo quieren aquí. (but the rich do not want him here.)

Bernie Sanders se llama el compa,  (Bernie Sanders is the ‘compa’s’ name)

su quemazón ahora van a sentir. (And now you will feel his Bern.)  

 

Nueva York estado que lo vio nacer, (The state of New York is where he was born)

En las calles de Brooklyn se crío,  (In the streets of Brooklyn he was raised)

Desde niño empezó a notar, (Since he was a child he started to see)   

Que los ricos se hacían más ricos, (That the rich just kept getting richer)

Y los pobres todo el día chambeando, (And the poor who were working all day)

Y muchos ni tenían para el frijol. (Barely had enough to eat.)

 

 

Hijo de padres inmigrantes, (He’s the son of immigrant parents,)

que vinieron a mejorar sus vidas, (who came to make a better life for themselves,)

Trabajando para salir adelante, (working hard to get ahead,)

como todos lo hacemos hoy en día. (like we all do every day.)

Venimos con el mismo sueño,  (We all come with the same dream,)

sacar adelante a nuestras familias. (make a better life for our families.)

 

¡Y echale compa Bernie! (Let’s go Bernie!)

Hasta llegar a la Casa Blanca. (All the way to the White House.)

 

Los ricos ni la tele lo quieren, (Neither the rich, nor TV like him, )

Tienen miedo que vaya a ganar, (They’re scared he might win,)

Porque quiere que el colegio sea gratis, (Because he wants college to be free,)

Pa’ que nuestros hijos puedan triunfar, (So our kids can succeed.)

Quiere cuidado de salud para todos, (He wants health insurance for all,)

Sea ciudadano o seas illegal. (whether or not you’re a citizen.)

 

En Chicago caio tras las rejas, (In Chicago, he fell behind prison bars,)

Por protestar contra la segregación, (For fighting against segregation,)

No le importa el color de tu piel, (He doesn’t care about the color of your skin,)

Pa’ el todos somos hijos de Dios. (He thinks we’re all children of God.)

Muchos le apodan ‘Robin Hood,’ (Many call him Robin Hood,)

otros le dicen ‘El Quemazón.’ (Others call him The Bern.)

 

Peleando por los derechos humanos, (Fighting for human rights,)

Pero ni la ley lo aplaco, (Not even the law could stop him,)

El sigue luchando hasta ser (He’ll keep fighting until he is)

Presidente de esta nación. (the president of this country.)

Bernie Sanders se llama el compa (Bernie Sanders is the compa’s name,)

Este es su corrido ‘El Quemazón.’ (This is his song, The Bern.)

A Mexican-American Norteño band from Southern California wrote a song praising Bernie Sanders.
A Mexican-American Norteño band from California wrote a song praising Bernie Sanders.

Correction: This story has been updated. The band “Grupo La Meta” is from Modesto, which is not in Southern California. 

 

Full transcript: Javier Palomarez interview with American-Statesman

Javier Palomarez is the President and CEO of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC), America's largest Hispanic business association.
Javier Palomarez is the president and CEO of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, America’s largest Hispanic business association.

Javier Palomarez, the president and CEO of the U.S. Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, which represents 4.1 million Hispanic-owned businesses, visited Austin this week. In an interview with the American-Statesman, Palomarez spoke candidly about the chamber’s campaign to make the U.S. Senate vote on a hearing to confirm Roberta Jacobson to the role of ambassador to Mexico, Marco Rubio’s opposition to that nomination, Donald Trump’s presidential candidacy and the importance of Austin to the future of Latino businesses in America.

Not everything in the wide-ranging interview made it into our newspaper Saturday, but here at Somos Austin, we decided to give you a full transcript of the conversation. For reference, Jacobson was nominated by President Barack Obama to fill the role of ambassador to Mexico last year. The career diplomat who speaks fluent Spanish and is an expert in Latin American politics has yet to be confirmed. The United States has not had an ambassador to Mexico, one of its most important allies, since August.

Here, in full, is our conversation with Palomarez:

American-Statesman: I heard that you’ve been speaking with Roberta Jacobson, let’s start off with that because you wrote a pretty strong op-ed in our paper and I wanted to get more of your thoughts. Why is the USHCC pushing so hard? Why do you think this is so important?

Javier Palomarez: First of all, I want to thank the Austin American-Statesman for running the op-ed in the first place because we think it’s important that we call light to this issue.

The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce represents 4.1 million Hispanic-owned firms in this country that collectively contribute over $661 billion to the American economy,and as a business association, we recognize clearly the importance of commercial and economic relations that exist between Mexico and the United States. I’ve spoken to the president personally on this issue. The reality of it is… in Mexico we have had a crucially important commercial partner, economic ally as well as a national security ally, I won’t even touch on that. But the reality of it is that Mexico does more business and is a better and stronger commercial and economic partner to the United States, we do more business, we do more trade with Mexico than we do with Great Britain, than we do with Germany, than we do with France, India, Brazil, with Japan and the list goes on. We need the top diplomat in that country. We’ve been waiting for nine months now.

Sadly, there are three members of the Senate that have been blocking her vote, that have refused to vote. Have blocked the vote. And one of those is Marco Rubio. We’re happy that very recently, maybe about two weeks ago, Sen. (Bob) Menendez (of New Jersey) after eight months finally conceded the point and has called for the vote. We’re now looking at Marco Rubio and asking him to do the same thing. The reality of it is… Marco Rubio has missed 129 of the 243 votes that he was called upon since he decided to run for the presidency.

He is no longer running for president. He no longer has an excuse. It’s time to put good policy in front of politics. He needs to get down there and cast his vote and allow this woman to have her day in court. Roberta Jacobson is a life-long diplomat, has a stellar record. She is more than prepared to do this job and the USHCC and all of our constituents (are) firmly behind her.

There have been some amazing members of the Senate on both sides. (Tom) Udall on the Democratic side, Martin Heinrich, Amy Klobuchar that have been very supportive of this effort that I’m trying to lead. On the Republican side you’ve got John Cornyn, you’ve got John McCain, specifically you’ve got Jeff Flake, who’s been a real champion of this and I want to commend those senators for putting politics aside and doing the right thing. America needs to honor the relationship we have with Mexico. This should not be politicized. There is no reason why this woman has been put on hold for almost nine months now. This is an important commercial issue. This is not political, it is not racial, it’s about commerce, it’s about the economy, it’s about the continued well-being of both our economies and we need to get on with the business of getting on with it.

Statesman: I want to ask you specifically about Marco Rubio and politicizing this issue on Jacobson because, as I understand it, he kept putting off meeting with you at USHCC for your presidential chats, and now that he’s not running for it, do you think he’s likely to change his mind on it?

Palomarez: Well, I sure hope so. I can understand that running for the presidency is very, it’s a trying effort. It’s not an endeavor that one takes on lightly and I understand the strains on his calendar, but that’s behind us now. It’s time to get to work, to do what you were hired to do. You’re a senator. Go cast your vote. We’re not asking him to vote for Roberta Jacobson, we’re asking you to remove the hold and get on with the business of voting, and to politicize this, I think, is at best bad for our economy and, frankly, I think puts us at risk of offending a crucial commercial ally that is Mexico, that has been that kind of an ally for almost two centuries now. We should honor that relationship. We need to place the top diplomat on behalf of the United States in Mexico and Roberta Jacobson is that woman.

Statesman: Do you think that was a political move by Marco Rubio?

Palomarez:: Clearly. Marco Rubio I think has politicized this thing. I think this has more to do with what the president decided to do to normalize relationships with Cuba. He is, I think utilizing that as a (inaudible)… and regardless of what he said, listen if you don’t think the woman’s prepared, then vote and vote against her, it’s just that simple. But vote. You’ve missed 129 of the 243 votes you were called upon, you have the worst track record of any senator in America. It’s time to get to work, Marco. This is serious and we’ve been asking.

Statesman: If you have nothing else to add on that one….

Palomarez: We better stop (laughter)… Ya me enoje (I’m upset now)  (laughter).

Statesman: I want to ask you about the presidential chats that you have had with candidates. As I understand it, you’ve met, I think with all of them, the ones that are in there, except Donald Trump, who very publicly pulled out of a conversation with you. Has there been any talk of bringing him back in for one of those chats.

Palomarez: Yeah, we continue a dialogue with Donald Trump’s campaign. You’re right. We met with Ted Cruz, with Bernie Sanders, with Martin O’Malley, with John Kasich, with Jeb Bush, with Hillary Clinton. Marco agreed when he and I spoke personally he thought it was a great idea, I did too, and unfortunately, calendars being what they are and schedules being what they are, and again, when you’re running to be the president of the United States it’s a trying endeavor and so we were never able to make that happen.

And of course, famously, Donald Trump 48 hours or so before the actual date of the Q&A backed out, but the door is open. We are not a partisan organization, we’re not even a political organization, we just believe that anybody who’s running for the presidency of the United States should avail themselves of the opportunity to sit in front of our constituency, again that represents 4.1 million-owned firms, $661 billion in economic contribution and represents this amazingly rapidly growing community called the Hispanic community. Every 30 seconds a Latino turns age 18 in this country and becomes an eligible voter. That’s 60,000 brand new votes every single month and that’ll be the case in the next 21 years in a row. So, if you’re running for an elected office, whether that’s dog catcher or president of the United States, you’d do well to avail yourself of an opportunity to come and state your case in the presence of the United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce and talk to our constituency of Hispanic business owners.

Statesman: Do you think his comments that he has made, some of which are racial or anti-immigrant or anti-Mexican, do you think those statements hurt him with the 4.1 million firms that make up your constituency?

Palomarez: Clearly it has hurt him with the Hispanic community. Clearly it has hurt him with Americans. This is beyond being a Hispanic issue. This is an American issue… and in my opinion someone running for the American presidency should be an individual who tries to convene and coalesce and bring people together and heal the nation, not be divisive and speak from a position of bigotry and hatred and fear-mongering. I don’t want to speak for Donald Trump, he needs to state his own case, but certainly, the reaction that I’m seeing and the language and the rhetoric that he’s used, to me really has put him in a place where he’s got a lot of making up to do, not only with the Hispanic community, with common good-hearted, loyal Americans. I think the entirety of the Hispanic community and a good portion of the rest of America is very disappointed and appalled at some of the language coming out of that campaign.

Statesman: Do you think he’s scared of some of the questions you might ask? It’s not an easy conversation. I saw the one where you were speaking with Bernie Sanders and he said something like “your people” and you sort of corrected him. Do you think he’s scared of the questions you might ask?

Palomarez: I think he’s a little bit worried about the kind of questions he’s going to have to deal with. Certainly when they pulled out they wanted some concessions that we’re not willing to make. I have to say that in his private conversations with me he has been a gentleman. And I can’t speak for him. I can tell you that of all of the candidates, he’s the one who didn’t come.

Statesman: And famously, you said after he pulled out that there’s no way he wins the White House.

Palomarez: No. No.

Statesman: I saw that in a Fox News Latino article.

Palomarez: Yeah, yeah. No, that’s not going to happen.

Statesman: Do you still believe that even as far along as we are right now?

Palomarez: Oh, absolutely. I mean, it plays well in certain pockets. It plays well in certain arenas. The polls look good. But even then, he was making an argument in Nevada that quote-unquote “the Hispanics love me. I won the Hispanic vote in Nevada, I had 44 percent of the Hispanic vote.” There again, once you dig below the surface, that poll was an entrance poll, it polled 1,573 people that were Republican. Of those 1,573, 8 percent of them were Hispanic, so that’s (125), and 44 percent of those (125) voted for Donald Trump. So in essence, he got 55 votes.

(Editor’s note: Palomarez was speaking of the top of his head, so we had to double check the numbers after the interview and changed it accordingly in this transcript. For a similar breakdown of those numbers, click on this Somos Austin post from February, Trump’s numbers with Latinos in Nevada.)

From that, he extrapolated the “Hispanics love me, I got 44 percent of the Hispanic vote.” That’s absolutely inaccurate and that’s classic Donald Trump. Once you dig even one layer below the verbiage and the rhetoric and you start to look at the facts, you know, it all falls apart. But it’s going to be fun to see. I’m waiting for the general election for when the Hispanic community coalesces.

If anything, Donald Trump has done a great service to the Hispanic community in that I have never seen the Hispanic community so engaged, I’ve never seen it so coalesced around an issue. It’s less about who they’re voting for than who they’re voting against, and they are 100 percent concrete and coalesced around this notion of voting against Donald Trump. Again, we don’t pick sides. We are an organization that is about business, we are about commerce. We’re not s political organization and we’re not a partisan organization, but my read of the tea leaves and what I’m hearing from other Hispanics and other Hispanic leaders in the nation, that’s kind of where that sentiment that I’m sharing with you now is coming from. The door remains open to Donald Trump to come to our organization and be treated as fairly as everyone else was, but with no preferential treatment either. We will not pull any punches, but we’re not looking to debate him, we’re simply giving him an opportunity to state his case in front of our community and the conversation continues, it’s been very civil and we’ll see where it goes from there.

Statesman: Let’s talk about the importance of Austin to USHCC. You’ve got a strong chapter here, obviously.

Palomarez: We have an amazing leader here. Mark Madrid who runs the Greater Austin Hispanic Chamber of Commerce has really hit the market strong. You see that crowd out there, that’s indicative of the excitement around our organization and what we continue to do. You know, we advocate on behalf of 4.1 million business owners who happen to be of Hispanic descent, but we never forget that we’re first and foremost American business owners. Every tax bill we pay, every job we create, every product we manufacture, every service we provide goes to benefit the American economy. And in that context, we believe that our business group of American business owners is important to the continued growth of any city in America, but certainly the continued growth of Austin.

I believe by the year 2020, Austin is projected to have something like 52,000 Hispanic-owned firms here, driving something like $12.8 billion of economic contributions. That’s significant and I think that the entrepreneurial spirit, the DNA, the ethos of Austin is perfect not only for a Hispanic entrepreneur but for any entrepreneur and certainly to include Hispanic entrepreneurs. This is a city that welcomes diversity of thought, that embraces innovation and creativity, and those are some of the basic elements that you need when you’re building your own enterprise, your own business and certainly we’re looking to do everything we can to spur the growth of Hispanic-owned businesses in this city. I just met with the mayor. I think Mayor Adler is the right man for the job, he recognizes the potential in the Hispanic market and certainly the Hispanic entrepreneurial and business community, and so we’re thrilled to be here to celebrate the continued growth of our organization, the continued growth of our Hispanic-owned businesses in this country, which by the way, are growing at a rate of 3-to-1 when compared to the general market. So this is an asset to the American people, to the American society that can be harnessed, and if there’s a city that I think can illustrate how to do it best, it certainly is Austin, Texas.

Statesman: Final thing, going back to Jacobson, do you think the vote for her appointment is going to come soon?

Palomarez: We’re very hopeful. I think if Marco Rubio will do as Sen. Menendez did, if he will put politics aside, if he’ll put policy ahead of politics, and at least go do his job and vote, I think that they’ll be calling for a vote soon and we remain hopeful. We want to work with anybody who sees this issue as we see it: as an important commercial and economic issue that is critically important to the well-being of the relationship between these two commercial allies. And so we’re hopeful that we’ll be seeing a vote here very soon.

Statesman: So it doesn’t sound like you think the presidential election weighs in on this anymore.

Palomarez: I can’t imagine that it would. It’s time for Marco to get back to work. Right now, missing 53 percent of your votes, having the worst voting record in the Senate, missing 129 of the 243 votes that you were hired to vote upon. That’s inconceivable, it’s not acceptable and I think the excuse of saying I’m running for the presidency, I’m busy campaigning, that’s gone and it’s time to get back to work. We’re hopeful he’ll do the right thing.

Casa México will return to SXSW in 2017

The Mariachi del Sur from Bedichek Middle School under the direction of Philip Swasey performs at the Casa Mexico SXSW Interactive showcase at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on March 11, 2016. (John Clark for American-Statesman)
The Mariachi del Sur from Bedichek Middle School, under the direction of Philip Swasey, performs at the Casa Mexico SXSW Interactive showcase at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center on March 11, 2016. (John Clark for American-Statesman)

Just a day after the end of Mexico’s first large-scale participation in South by Southwest, the consul general of Mexico in Austin, Carlos González Gutiérrez, said Tuesday that the Casa México showcase would return to the festival in 2017.

The event, organized by various sectors of the Mexican government, private businesses and a prestigious Mexican university, was held at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center from March 11 to 14. Its focus was on promoting Mexico as a hub for culture and innovation and was home to several panels on entrepreneurship and technology and various fast-pitch competitions.

“The event went very well,” González Gutiérrez said. “I think Casa México filled a void and it’s here to stay.”

Lee esta nota en español aquí 

The Mexican diplomat said there were some growing pains during the showcase that led to poor participation in some of the events. It also had difficulty attracting people from other showcases. Other setbacks included musical acts not arriving in time for their scheduled sets. Famed Mexican DJ Toy Selectah, for example, missed his set playing the inaugural ceremony Friday and was rescheduled to play Saturday.

González Gutiérrez said some of the logistic failures were due to a rushed preparation. The organizing committee for the event planned Casa México in three months.

“I think we learned a lot from our mistakes,” he said. “We needed to jump into the water to learn how to swim and I think we demonstrated that Mexico has a very important role here and a very strong presence.”

Still, the event also had significant success. It attracted big names in the technology field such as Mario Valle Reyes, director of business development in emerging markets for Electronic Arts, and high-ranking Mexican diplomats like Carlos Perez-Verdía, the country’s undersecretary to North America. And the showcase was also the site of the announcement of a new $30 million venture fund in Austin that will help develop foreign-born entrepreneurs.

González Gutiérrez said that in 2017 the event’s organizers will look to include discussions with SXSW organizers so that its panels can take place inside the Austin Convention Center or in another venue downtown, where much of the festival’s foot traffic is. Next year’s event, González Gutiérrez said, will likely be shorter than four days and the marketing and promotion will be improved. The space for networking sessions, which was one of the most popular features of the showcase, will likely be enlarged, he added.

Additional reporting by James Barragán

What to look out for at SXSW’s Casa México on Saturday

Centravrvs plays on the first night of Casa México on Friday, March 11, 2015. James Barragán/ AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN
Centavrvs plays on the first night of Casa México on Friday, March 11, 2015. James Barragán/ AUSTIN AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Saturday will kick off the second day of the inaugural Casa México event at South by Southwest.

The event’s organizers, which include the Mexican government, business leaders and a prestigious Mexican university, hope to showcase the country as a powerhouse for culture, technology and innovation. Here are some of the panels to look out for on Saturday. All events will be held at the Emma S. Barrientos Mexican American Cultural Center.

Mario Valle, director of business development in emerging markets for Electronic Arts, will speak at a panel at 2 p.m. titled Mexico 2030: The King of the Emerging World. Valle, who is Mexican, will discuss how Mexico and Latinos in the United States are poised to play a large role in the future of the video game industry.

At 4 p.m., Latin American analyst Reggie Thompson will moderate a chat with Mexico’s Undersecretary to North America Carlos Perez-Verdía on the challenges ahead in U.S.-Mexico relations. Expect some chatter on the importance of Texas to that relationship and the inevitable Donald Trump question.

At 6:30 p.m., Mexican government and business leaders alongside Austin Mayor Steve Adler will officially announce the launching of the Pan American Venture Fund and Accelerator, a $30 million initiative that will help develop Mexican businesses that will gradually move to Austin when they are ready to seek bigger funding.

The event also has some musical performances tonight. Fusion band Nortec Collective, will play the Casa México stage from 6 to 8 p.m. Toy Selectah, who missed his set Friday, is scheduled to play from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m., followed by Mexican rock band Centavrvs from 10 p.m. to 11 p.m.

Latino groups participating in Amplify Austin

Amplify Austin, the annual online day of giving, has kicked off. It’s the chance for more than 600 nonprofits across Central Texas to get some much needed exposure and donations. This year, the event hopes to raise $9 million.

Here at Somos Austin, we’ve compiled a list of nonprofits that specifically serve Latinos or have it in their mission to enrich the understanding of Latino cultures in Central Texas. It’s complete with links to their donation sites. Give away!

Amigos de las Americas, Austin Chapter

Goal: $6,000

This group trains young leaders in high school and college to become immersed in cross-cultural experiences and sends its members to go live and volunteer in various Latin American countries including Costa Rica, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador , Nicaragua, Mexico, Panama, Peru and Paraguay.

Casa Marianella

Goal: $25,000

This nonprofit aims to create community within Latin American immigrants and international refugees by providing hospitality and promoting self-sufficiency.

Esquina Tango

Goal: $4,000

A nonprofit group that aims to foster personal wellness by promoting an appreciation for Latin cultures through dance and language classes as well as social events.

Hispanic Scholarship Consortium

Goal: $6,000

Provides scholarships for Central Texas Hispanic students.

Manos de Cristo

Goal: $100,000

Promotes dignity and self-reliance by meeting basic needs with food and clothing for low-income individuals. The group also provides essential oral care and helps further educational development.

Mexic-Arte Museum

Goal: $5,000

The museum dedicates itself to cultural enrichment and education through  the collection, preservation and presentation of traditional and contemporary Mexican, Latino, and Latin American art and culture to promote dialogue and understanding among its visitors.

LUPE Arte

Goal: $15,000

Latinas Unidas Por El Arte (LUPE Arte) promotes the arts and culture by providing arts education to youth and helping connect emerging and professional artists with employment opportunities. The group is also focused on promoting women artists and sharing Latino arts and culture with the community.

Roy Lozano’s Ballet Folklorico de Texas

Goal: $3,000

Aims to enrich culture in Austin through traditional Mexican folk dances and other educational programs.

Teatro Vivo

Goal: $10,000

This nonprofit produces and promotes Latino theater that provides a window into the Latino community and makes theater accessible to all audiences, especially those with little exposure to the arts.

The Hispanic Alliance

Goal: $5,000

This group works to ensure the success and growth of Austin’s Hispanic community by providing access to tools, training and other opportunities that allow Hispanic individuals to reach their full potential.

Goal: $15,000
A statewide, membership-based organization that empowers low-income workers to achieve fair employment through education, direct services, organizing and strategic partnerships.
If you know any Latino-specific nonprofits we missed, email jbarragan@statesman.com to let us know.