Poll: Latinos oppose Trump, back Clinton, lean Democrat

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop at the Flynn Center of the Performing Arts in Burlington, Vt., Thursday, Jan. 7, 2016. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)
A poll released Wednesday indicates that nearly 80 percent of Latinos in battleground states have an unfavorable view of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Latinos in battleground states oppose Donald Trump’s proposals and lean toward ideas espoused by the Democratic party, according to a poll released Wednesday.

The poll conducted by Latino Decisions on behalf of the Latino Victory Project surveyed 800 registered Latino voters in battleground states during last week’s convention has a margin of error of 3.5 percentage points. The poll was conducted in English and Spanish based on the respondent’s choice and used a mix of online surveys and landline and cell phone interviews. Respondents to the poll came from Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Iowa, Michigan, North Carolina, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Wisconsin

The Latino Victory Project is a non-partisan group co-founded by Eva Longoria that works to ensure that the voices of Latinos are heard at all levels of government. It has endorsed Hillary Clinton for president.

Seventy-one percent of Latinos in battleground states said they would likely vote for Clinton if the election was today, compared to 24 percent who said the same about Trump. Sixty-four percent said the Democratic Party was more aligned with their views, compared to 26 percent who said the Republican Party was more reflective of them on issues.

The poll found that 75 percent of Latinos have an overall favorable view of President Barack Obama. Sixty-two percent have an overall favorable view of Hillary Clinton, while only 20 percent have an overall favorable view of Trump. The Republican vice presidential candidate, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence, did only slightly better with 24 percent of respondents saying they had an overall favorable view of him.

And the poll indicated that Trump would have an overall negative effect on other Republicans. Overall, 62 percent of respondents said they are less likely to vote for a Republican who says they disagree with Trump on many things but will still support him in the presidential election. Even if Republican candidates said they would not support Trump, only 33 percent of respondents said that would make them overall more likely to vote for that candidate.

Seventy-five percent of Latinos in battleground states said Trump had encouraged audiences to be angry and hostile toward Latinos, Muslims and immigrants. Similarly, 73 percent said Trump’s campaign events had been violent and dangerous, and 71 percent said Trump had contributed to making the country angrier and more divided on racial issues.

On policy proposals, respondents also rejected Trump and tended toward ideas pushed by the Democratic party.

Ninety-five percent of those surveyed said people should be required to pass a background check to buy a gun and 67 percent supported a ban on assault weapon sales. Eighty percent of Latinos said they supported addressing climate change by making clean energy technology and jobs.

Eighty-two percent said they supported a comprehensive immigration reform with a pathway to citizenship. Thirteen percent of respondents said all undocumented immigrants living in the country should be deported.

Sixty-eight percent supported raising the minimum wage to $15 an hour and 86 percent supported giving parents paid leave. Ninety-four percent said that overall they supported strengthening laws to ensure women get paid the same as men for equal work.

In contrast to a perception of Latinos as more conservative leaning on social issues, the poll showed that 68 percent believe that laws should not interfere with women’s reproductive health care, including access to contraception and abortion.

Twenty-six percent of respondents supported Trump’s proposal to temporarily ban Muslims from entering the country, but 57 percent said that a religious test that singles out a single group is against American values.

Thirty-five percent of Latinos said the Affordable Health Care Act should be repealed, as Trump has promised to move to do on his first day in office. But 59 percent said it is working well and should remain in place.

In this year’s election, 36 percent of Latinos in battleground states are more motivated to vote than they were in 2012 and 35 percent of those respondents attribute that to wanting to stop Trump and fight back against racism.

Click here for the full results of the survey

 

Texas Democrats suggest a Castro brother take over as DNC chair

The Texas Democratic Party have suggested that either Julian or Joaquin Castro should take over as chairman of the Democratic National Party after Debbie Wasserman Schultz, the current chairwoman, announced her resignation Sunday.

U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Julián Castro, will visit Austin on Thursday to speak with the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials. Photo from November 20, 2014. RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN
U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, Julián Castro, will visit Austin on Thursday to speak with the National Association of Housing and Redevelopment Officials. Photo from November 20, 2014.
RALPH BARRERA/ AMERICAN-STATESMAN

“In our humble opinion Texas Democrats believe that both Julian and Joaquin Castro have what it takes to pick up the reins and move the party forward,” Texas Democratic Party Chairman Gilberto Hinojosa said in a statement. “It would be remarkable to have the first Hispanic chair of the Democratic National Committee.”

Julian Castro, the current Secretary of Housing and Urban Development was considered by many a possible vice presidential candidate before Hillary Clinton announced Virginia Senator Tim Kaine as her running mate Friday. Joaquin Castro is a U.S. representative from San Antonio. Both hail from the Alamo city and are popular figures among Texas Democrats.

Wasserman Schultz, who will step down after the completion of the Democratic National Convention on Thursday, has faced recent scrutiny after the publication of leaked emails from Democratic National Committee staffers that appear to favor Clinton over her competitor Bernie Sanders during the presidential primaries. She served as chair of the committee since May 2011.

“Texas Democrats thank Congresswoman Wasserman Schultz for her hard work, leadership and commitment to our great party,” Hinojosa said in his statement. “She has fought heart and soul for this party, and we are well-poised to succeed in November because of her efforts.”

Donna Brazile, a Democratic strategist and the vice chair of the Democratic National Committee, will act as interim chairwoman through the end of the presidential election, according to committee spokesman, Luis Miranda.

Donald Trump, the Republican presidential candidate, responded to Wasserman Schultz’s resignation on Twitter.

“The highly neurotic Debbie Wasserman Schultz is angry that, after stealing and cheating her way to a Crooked Hillary victory, she’s out!”

Open tryouts for new Central Texas semi-pro soccer team

Think you’ve got what it takes to play for a semi-pro soccer team? The recently formed Central Texas Lobos, a semi-pro team out of Kyle, will hold tryouts Saturday, July 23, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. at Gregg-Clarke Park.

The Central Texas Lobos semi-pro soccer team was unveiled this month during a ceremony in Kyle. CORTESÍA ZUZECA
The Central Texas Lobos semi-pro soccer team was unveiled this month during a ceremony in Kyle. CORTESÍA ZUZECA

Tryouts are open to all ages but the team is interested in developing young talent, said Jose Ramos, the team’s coach.

“We’re looking for youth, youth, youth,” Ramos said. “We’re looking for people between 16 and 23 or 24 years old.”

Ramos, who hails from Ciudad Juárez, said the team is focused on young players because it hopes to start a soccer academy for players under 17. Organizers also hope to eventually create farm teams that will help them develop players for the team.

The team will play in the Texas Premier Soccer League, which runs between September and March. And the team has high hopes: its goal is to one day become a fully professional team playing in a second division soccer league, like the United Soccer League or the North American Soccer League. Austin ostensibly still has a team, the Austin Aztex, in the USL, although the team was forced to sit out this season after not finding a venue to play in, and its future in the city is unclear.

Ramos coached Texas State’s men’s soccer team in 2015 and is confident in his ability to scout talent in the area to help the team move up to the professional ranks. He said the team’s goal is to discover local players who can represent the area and be scouted by universities and teams in the United States and Mexico.